Recent Research Highlights

Not all brains are equal: Why the human brain is more vulnerable to disease

With the help of cerebral organoids, IMBA scientists were able to ascertain that Tuberous Sclerosis, a rare neurodevelopmental genetic disorder,…

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Breakthrough research on human blastoids and impact on IVF and contraception

The development of human blastoids, human embryo models at IMBA, paves the way for improving in vitro fertilization success rate and new non-hormonal,…

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How cells keep their nucleus clean: a fundamental discovery

Scientists at the Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP) in Vienna have developed a CRISPR-Cas9 screening assay that allows to systematically…

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Mission possible: how cohesin fits two meters of DNA into a human cell

Human cells fit extremely long DNA molecules into their microscopic nucleus. To do so, they need the help of a protein complex, cohesin, that acts…

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Cross-resistance: when cancer therapy backfires

Scientists at the IMP and collaborators have investigated how different forms of cancer therapy can influence the efficacy of subsequent therapies.…

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Disrupting ribosome production – renewed potential for cancer therapy

Proliferating cells are in constant need of ribosomes, the molecular machines that help them produce proteins. Tumour cells, for instance, divide…

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A new role for histone modifications in genomic imprinting

Imprinted genes are expressed from either the paternal or maternal allele. Reporting in Nature Communications, scientists led by Martin Leeb have now…

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The left panel corresponds to an artistic collage, showing Spo11-complexes (blue and yellow shapes) that cleave pieces out of chromosomes (shown in black). Red halos depict DNA-damage signalling. Liberated pieces carry a part of the Spo11-complex on each end. The right panel shows observed chromosomal break sites at a meiotic recombination hotspot. Each arc labels start and end of an isolated fragment coming from a different cell. Wild-type fragments are in red, fragments from a mutant that doesn’t degrade longer fragments, are in blue. (c) Franz Klein, Chromosomenbiologie, Universität Wien

Meiosis: Mind the gap

Meiosis is a specialized cell division process required to generate gametes, the reproductive cells of an organism. During meiosis, paternal and…

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Colouring tumours reveals their bad influence

Red2Onco, an innovative genetic mouse model, allows to detect the very initial steps that lead to cancer development. Red2Onco’s multi-colour…

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Cardioids – Heartbeat, heartbreak and recovery in a dish

Self-organizing heart organoids developed at IMBA – Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences – are also effective…

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Lockdown for genome parasites

Researchers at GMI – Gregor Mendel Institute of Molecular Plant Biology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences – uncover an ingenious mechanism by which…

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Record-breaking lungfish genome reveals how vertebrates conquered land

380 million years ago, fish started to crawl out of the water to colonise land. The Australian lungfish – an endangered, air-breathing fish – is one…

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