Hidden in plain sight: A-type lamins in the nucleus

Insoluble and stable higher-order lamin A/C structures in the nuclear interior of LAP2alpha KO cells revealed by super resolution immunofluorescence microscopy (c) Nana Naetar, Foisner Lab

Insoluble and stable higher-order lamin A/C structures in the nuclear interior of LAP2alpha KO cells revealed by super resolution immunofluorescence microscopy (c) Nana Naetar, Foisner Lab

Lamins are structural proteins found at the nuclear periphery, where they regulate the mechanical properties of the nucleus and the organization of genetic material within the nucleus. However, they also play a poorly understood role in the nucleoplasm. New work from the lab of Roland Foisner and their collaborators from the Bar Ilan University (Israel) now shows that binding of A-type lamins in the nuclear interior to a protein called LAP2α regulates their mobility and that of surrounding chromatin. The study is published in e-life.

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